Trademarking a Cannabis Brand: What You Need to Know

Cannabis is one of the fastest-growing and most lucrative industries in the United States. According to a recent report by Grand View Research, the U.S. legal cannabis market size was valued at $13.2 billion in 2022 and is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 14.2% from 2023 to 2030. However, cannabis businesses face unique challenges in protecting their trademarks and brands, due to the complex and evolving legal landscape of cannabis regulation.

a store front that has "Cannabis Sold Here" on the window with a leaf drawn above it

Cannabis is one of the fastest-growing and most lucrative industries in the United States. According to a recent report by Grand View Research, the U.S. legal cannabis market size was valued at $13.2 billion in 2022 and is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 14.2% from 2023 to 2030. However, cannabis businesses face unique challenges in protecting their trademarks and brands, due to the complex and evolving legal landscape of cannabis regulation.

Trademarks are words, symbols, designs, or combinations of these elements that identify and distinguish the source of goods or services of one party from those of others. Trademarks are valuable assets that help consumers recognize and trust the quality and reputation of a brand. Trademarks are also important for preventing confusion, deception, and unfair competition in the marketplace.

However, not all trademarks are eligible for registration or protection under the law. One of the main requirements for trademark registration is that the mark must be used in lawful commerce. This means that the goods or services associated with the mark must comply with federal law, as well as state and local laws where applicable.

The problem is that cannabis is still illegal under federal law, as it is classified as a Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This means that cannabis has no federally accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Therefore, any trademark application that involves cannabis or cannabis-related products or services may be refused by the USPTO on the grounds that it violates the CSA and is not used in lawful commerce.

This poses a dilemma for cannabis businesses that want to protect their trademarks and brands. How can they register and enforce their trademarks when their products or services are illegal under federal law? Is there any way to overcome this obstacle and secure their rights?

The answer is not straightforward, as there are different types of cannabis products and services, and different levels of legality and regulation depending on the state and federal laws. However, there are some possible strategies and solutions that cannabis businesses can consider to trademark their brands. Here are some examples:

  • Hemp products: Hemp is a variety of cannabis that contains less than 0.3% THC (the psychoactive component of cannabis) by dry weight. Hemp products, such as CBD oil, hemp seeds, hemp fiber, hemp clothing, etc., are legal under federal law since the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, which removed hemp from the definition of marijuana under the CSA. Therefore, hemp products can be registered as trademarks with the USPTO, as long as they comply with other federal laws and regulations, such as those enforced by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

  • Ancillary services: Ancillary services are services that support or facilitate the cannabis industry, but do not directly involve the cultivation, distribution, or consumption of cannabis. For example, ancillary services may include consulting, marketing, software, packaging, testing, banking, insurance, etc. Ancillary services may be eligible for trademark registration with the USPTO, as long as they do not promote or facilitate illegal activities under federal law. However, ancillary services may still face challenges or risks from federal authorities or third parties who may oppose or challenge their trademark applications or registrations.

  • State trademarks: State trademarks are trademarks that are registered with a state government agency instead of the USPTO. State trademarks offer protection within the state where they are registered, but not nationwide. State trademarks may be an option for cannabis businesses that operate in states where cannabis is legal for medical or recreational use under state law. However, state trademarks may not offer sufficient protection against infringers who operate in other states or online. State trademarks may also be subject to cancellation or invalidation if federal law changes or prevails over state law.

Conclusion

Trademarking a cannabis brand is not an easy task, as it involves navigating a complex and evolving legal landscape of cannabis regulation. Cannabis businesses need to be aware of the risks and challenges involved in registering and protecting their trademarks under federal and state laws. They also need to explore different strategies and solutions to secure their rights and avoid potential conflicts or liabilities.

If you have any questions about trademarking a cannabis brand or need professional assistance with your trademark matters, please feel free to contact us at [our law firm]. We are a team of experienced trademark attorneys who can help you with all your trademark needs. We offer a free initial consultation and a flat fee for our services. Contact us today and let us help you protect your brand identity and reputation. Thank you for reading!

Source

U.S. Cannabis Market Size, Share & Growth Report, 2030 (grandviewresearch.com)