What Classes Do I Need to File In For My Rock Band?

Trademarks are important for musicians and artists who want to protect their name, brand, and goodwill. In this blog, we will explain what trademark classes are, why they matter, and which ones you should consider for your rock band.

the inside of a music store showcasing CDs, band shirts, stickers and other rock memorabilia and merchandise

Trademarks are important for musicians and artists who want to protect their name, brand, and goodwill. In this blog, we will explain what trademark classes are, why they matter, and which ones you should consider for your rock band.

What are trademark classes?

Trademark classes are categories of goods and services that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) uses to organize and classify trademarks. There are 45 trademark classes in total, each with a specific description and examples of the types of goods and services that fall under it. For example, Class 9 covers “computer hardware and software; scientific apparatus and instruments; audiovisual and photographic devices; recorded content; digital media and publications; etc.” while Class 41 covers “education and entertainment services; sporting and cultural activities; training and instruction services; etc.”

Why do trademark classes matter?

Trademark classes matter because they determine the scope and extent of your trademark protection. When you file a trademark application, you must list the goods and/or services on or in connection with which you use or intend to use the mark in commerce. The USPTO will then assign one or more trademark classes to your application based on the goods and/or services you listed. The trademark classes will also affect the filing fee you have to pay, which is calculated per class of goods or services.

The USPTO will examine your trademark application to see if it meets the legal requirements for registration, such as distinctiveness, use in commerce, and likelihood of confusion. One of the factors that the USPTO considers when assessing likelihood of confusion is the similarity or relatedness of the goods and/or services covered by your mark and those covered by other registered or pending marks. Generally, the more similar or related the goods and/or services are, the more likely there is confusion. Therefore, choosing the right trademark classes for your mark is crucial to avoid potential conflicts with other marks and to secure strong protection for your mark.

Which trademark classes should I file in for my rock band?

The answer to this question depends on the nature and scope of your rock band’s activities and products. However, some common trademark classes that may be relevant for rock bands are:

  • Class 41: This is the most important class for rock bands, as it covers entertainment services in the nature of live vocal performances by musical bands as well as music production and non-downloadable music/videos. If you want to protect your rock band’s name as a service mark for your live shows, concerts, tours, festivals, music production, etc., you should file in Class 41.

  • Class 9: This class covers musical recordings in various formats, such as CDs, vinyl records, cassettes, tapes, DVDs, etc., as well as downloadable audio files featuring music. While there aren’t as many CDs or cassettes being produced these days, if you want to protect your rock band’s name as a trademark for your recorded music products, you should file in Class 9. However, note that if you are not the owner or producer of the recorded music, you need to demonstrate that you exercise control over the nature and quality of the music under your mark. This can be done by providing evidence of licensing agreements, contracts, quality control standards, etc.

  • Class 25: This class covers clothing items, such as T-shirts, hats, jackets, sweatshirts, etc., that may bear your rock band’s name or logo.

  • Class 16: This class covers paper goods and printed matter, such as posters, stickers, calendars, books, magazines, etc., that may feature your rock band’s name or image.

  • Class 18: This class covers leather goods and bags, such as wallets, purses, backpacks, and even bags like tote bags.

Are merchandise classes necessary for selling merchandise at concerts?

The answer to this question depends on how important merchandising is for your rock band’s business strategy and brand recognition. Filing in merchandise classes can help you prevent others from using your rock band’s name or logo on similar products without your permission. It can also help you create a consistent image and identity for your rock band across different product categories. However, filing in merchandise classes also involves additional costs and responsibilities. You have to pay a filing fee per class of goods or services. You also have to provide specimens showing how you use your mark on each class of goods or services. You also have to maintain and renew your registration by paying maintenance fees and filing declarations of use.

Therefore, before filing in merchandise classes, you should consider the following factors:

  • The demand and popularity of your merchandise products among your fans and customers

  • The potential revenue and profit from selling your merchandise products

  • The availability and affordability of your merchandise products

  • The uniqueness and distinctiveness of your merchandise products

  • The likelihood and impact of infringement or dilution of your mark by others

  • The cost and benefit of filing and maintaining your registration in each class

Conclusion

Trademark classes are important for rock bands who want to protect their name, brand, and goodwill. Choosing the right trademark classes for your rock band depends on the nature and scope of your activities and products. Some common trademark classes for rock bands are Class 41 for live performances, Class 9 for recorded music, and Class 25, 16, and 18 for merchandise. However, filing in merchandise classes also involves additional costs and responsibilities. Therefore, you should weigh the pros and cons of filing in each class before making a decision. I hope this blog has been helpful and informative for you. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us. Thank you for reading!